31 Central Alabama Schools Deemed ‘Failing’ in New Report {#iBelieve}

Image result for School Report Card Failing
Haley Townsend

Updated: Jan 24, 2018 06:22 PM CST

 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) — – 31 schools across central Alabama are listed as ‘failing’ according to a new report out from the Alabama Department of Public Education.

The guidelines for what defines a school as failing are either of the following:

(a) Is designated as a failing school by the State Superintendent of Education.

(b) Does not exclusively serve a special population of students and is listed in the lowest six percent of public K-12 schools based on the state standardized assessment in reading and math.

Click here for a list of all the failing schools in Alabama. 

Below is a list of the failing schools in the central Alabama area, by school system:

Greene County:

Greene County High School

Robert Brown Middle School (formerly Carver Middle School)

Hale County:

Greensboro High School

Hale County High School

Jefferson County:

Center Point High School

Minor High School

Pickens County:

Aliceville High School

Walker County:

Carbon Hill High School

Anniston City:

Anniston High School

Bessemer City:

Abrams Elementary School

Bessemer City High School

Birmingham City:

Barrett Elementary School

Charles A Brown Elementary School

George Washington Carver High School

Hayes K-8

Hemphill Elementary School

Hudson K-8 School

Huffman High School-Magnet

Jackson-Olin High School

Parker High School

Smith Middle School

Washington Elementary School

Jones Valley Middle School

Wenonah High School

Woodlawn High School-Magnet

Fairfield City:

Fairfield High Preparatory School

Robinson Elementary School

Midfield City:

Midfield High School

Rutledge High School

Tuscaloosa City:

Paul W Bryant High School

Central High School

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14 Birmingham City Schools were included on the list as failing.

The school system released the following statement:

“Birmingham City Schools was recently notified of its schools named to the “failing schools” list. Nevertheless, the system’s administration is committed to owning this performance data and utilizing it as a tool for continuous improvement to drive student achievement and professional growth.  While the data was just released today, the system’s administration had already begun, through the recent leadership transition, to put conditions, supports and strategies in place to improve both school and student performance.  “We are currently taking time to assess the failing schools data, as well as the data that will soon be publicly released on the state report card,” said Superintendent Lisa Herring.  “Although these won’t be our only indicators, the data will be used to drive our strategy, our plan of execution and our movement toward excellence.”